Tag Archives: FODMAPs

Gorilla Munch Trail Mix Ready to EAT

Gorilla Munch Trail Mix Treat

One of our family favorite breakfast cereals is Nature’s Path Gorilla Munch!  This slightly sweet little ball of corn is so tasty.  And my clients love it too!  I have used this cereal in a variety of recipes….today’s featured recipe is a Gorilla Munch Trail Mix!Gorilla Munch Trail Mix Ready to EATIn my recently launched balanced box for a digestive peace of mind,  I created a super yummy chicken tender recipe with a nice crunchy coating including crushed Gorilla Munch. This recipe is exclusive to the box! Mmmm! IMG_0526 Today’s recipe is super easy! Just mix some gluten free pretzels, Nature’s Path Environkidz Gorilla Munch cereal, a few semi-sweet chocolate chips, a handful of pepitas (hulled pumpkin seeds) and salted peanuts.  And you are good to go!

Gorilla Munch Trail mix

A sweet and savory combo…just perfect!  I keep a supply on hand to take as a snack on the go.   Want to whip some up?  Well, then…here is the recipe!

Gorilla Munch Trail Mix Treat

Ingredients

  • Serving size: ~1/2-3/4 cup mixture
  • 2 Cups Gluten free Pretzels ( I use Synder's of Hanover GF pretzel sticks)
  • 2 Cups Nature's Path Gorilla Munch
  • 1/2 cup semi-sweet chocolate chips
  • 1/4 pepitas
  • 1 cup salted peanuts (just salted, no extra seasonings)

Instructions

  1. Mix ingredients and store in air tight container.
Schema/Recipe SEO Data Markup by ZipList Recipe Plugin
http://blog.katescarlata.com/2014/10/22/gorilla-munch-trail-mix-treat/

Oh…and just because you know I am in love with my crazy dog Lucy.  I thought I would share a few pictures of her from our weekend!russ and lucyAnd here…getting some exercise!lucy sSo cute, right?! :)

thelatestscoop

Coconut and the low FODMAP diet

Hi FODMAPers…

Today’s Tuesday tip is about coconut! Early FODMAP research papers listed coconut milk as HIGH FODMAP…but more recent food analysis has yielded different results.  thelatestscoop

So…here’s the scoop about coconut for low FODMAP diet followers.  Per the Monash app my go to resource

  • Coconut milk (canned) is allowed in 1/2 cup portion per meal or snack
  • Coconut water is allowed in SMALL quantity < 1/4 cup per meal or snack
  • Shredded dried coconut is allowed in 1/4 cup per meal or snack

And of course, coconut oil which has NO carbs–has NO FODMAPs and can be incorporated per your personal health goals.

I love the flavor of coconut so try to incorporate a little whenever possible. :)

I have some fun recipes this week and a probiotic post coming up to share…so stay tuned.

And today, I am giving away a wonderful cookbook, Artisanal Gluten Free Cooking.   Not all the recipes are low FODMAP but many can become low FODMAP with a few simple tweaks.  It’s a gorgeous cookbook written by a husband and wife, Kelli and Peter Bronski.  Peter has celiac disease and Kelli has worked in the hospitality and restaurant business for years…and they collaborated to create this great cookbook!  Check it out!cookbook

If you’d like a chance to win this gorgeous book, this is what I am hoping for in exchange for a chance to win…

As you may have noticed I launched a new product:  a balanced box for a digestive peace of mind.  This box contains 5 delicious food products, recipes, a grocery shopping pad and more.  The feedback on the balanced box has been terrific…and we are so excited about it here at katescarlata.com! So much so… we can’t wait to launch the next box.  So…what I would LOVE to know is what would you like to see in the next box?  Recipe ideas? Fun products? Food samples? Please share…and you’ll be entered to win this beautiful gluten free cookbook!

 

 

 

 

 

pumpkin & mums

New Resource for FODMAPers!

Today’s tip will be short and sweet.  US canned pumpkin FODMAP results are finally here!!pumpkin & mums

It seems forever ago that I sent canned pumpkin to the Monash researchers.  In fact, I sent several boxes of US foods for testing.  What we learned:   Canned US pumpkin has moderate amount of FODMAPs.  Small amounts, 1/4 cup canned,  such as in an otherwise low FODMAP  slice of pumpkin pie, pumpkin bread or maybe a granola bar is low BUT 1/2 cup canned is moderate. Portion size matters!!  So…of course, this week’s recipe will feature some pumpkin….stay tuned!

The great news is that the Monash researches now how a blog to keep us all up dated on their latest FODMAP findings.  This will be a valuable spot for all of us to check periodically for the latest news straight from the lab down under.  So without further adieu…here is the link for the Monash blog!

IMG_0275

Quick Tips for the low FODMAP Vegetarian

Today, I thought I would provide a few tips for the vegetarian low FODMAP followers.   It’s tricky following the low FODMAP diet while enjoying a vegan diet as many of the traditional protein sources on a vegan diet are rich in FODMAPs.  My intern, Laura, compiled this great handout while working with me which offers some great tips: Vegan Menu Planning Low FODMAP.  I also offer a vegetarian FODMAP patient education handout in my handout packet to be used by registered dietitians.IMG_0275It’s  important to remember that the low FODMAP diet is a learning diet so you should be able to add back small amounts of legumes per your personal tolerance after the elimination diet.

Legumes with the lowest FODMAP content per Monash U app  include: CANNED lentils and chickpeas.  {Whole Foods has a suitable onion and garlic free canned lentil product, Westbrae brand.}  Having  legumes sitting in the water in the can for months allows some of the galacto-oligosaccharides to leach out into the water.  JUST remember to drain and rinse canned chickpeas and lentils prior to consumption!  The cut off amount for canned chickpeas is 1/4 cup per meal and 1/2 cup canned lentils per meal.

For a vegan low FODMAP diet, include suitable legumes as above, quinoa, buckwheat, firm traditional tofu, tempeh, suitable nuts, nut butters and seeds can boost your protein intake.

If you are following a lacto-ovo vegetarian low FODMAP diet diet–including lactose free milk, suitable low lactose cheeses, lactose free cow’s milk, lactose free yogurt such as Green Valley brand, and eggs will help up your protein intake.

Laura’s handout in the above link provides much greater detail and tips for vegetarians so do check it out!

I promise, I will provide a write up on the probiotic symposium I attended at Harvard Medical School….I have been busy working on other projects. :)

I am just about ready to launch my new website (this blog will stay the same!) …so my blog and site might be down a few days.  Hang tight!

 

flourless peanut butter & banana muffins

Flour-less Peanut Butter & Banana Muffins

Hello Friends.  I hope your week is going great and those of you in New England are enjoying the chillier air!

Colder weather for me says, ‘Turn on the oven and get baking!’.  How about you?

Today’s recipe share is a Flourless Peanut Butter and Banana mini muffin.  This was a recipe inspiration from Pinterest found on the original site here! I modified the recipe a little. My muffins didn’t come out quite as cute as hers….but tasted yummy!flourless peanut butter & banana muffinsWithout flour, these little tasty treats are quite moist.  They were a hit with the family.  And the good news…no special ingredients necessary.  I made a small batch (8 mini muffins) but feel free to double the recipe. All of the ingredients go into the blender and then into the muffin tins. Easy peasy.

Oh…and Julie K is the winner of the Artisanal Gluten-Free Cupcake book! Congrats Julie and a BIG thanks for all of your responses about how you chill out and relax!  So many great ideas and reminders that it is so important to give yourself permission to do nothing!

Flour-less Peanut Butter and Banana Muffins

Ingredients

  • Makes 8 mini muffins {Can double recipe}
  • 1/2 cup peanut butter (I used all natural Teddie brand)
  • 1 banana
  • 1 egg
  • 1 tablespoon pure maple syrup
  • 1/4 teaspoon baking soda
  • 2 tablespoons semi sweet chocolate chips (optional)

Instructions

  1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees and prepare mini muffin tin by spraying w/ oil or adding paper muffin tin liners
  2. Put all the ingredients (except the chocolate chips) into blender and blend until creamy about 1 minute.
  3. Pour mixture into muffin tins filling about 3/4 full.
  4. Top with about 4 chocolate chips per muffin, if using.
  5. Bake in preheated oven for about 10-12 minutes or until cake tester comes out clean.
  6. Enjoy!
Schema/Recipe SEO Data Markup by ZipList Recipe Plugin
http://blog.katescarlata.com/2014/09/18/flour-less-peanut-butter-banana-muffins/

milk truck

Low FODMAP diet is not dairy free!

milk truckThe low FODMAP diet is NOT a dairy free diet but rather low in lactose, the sugar found in cow, sheep and goat milk.

If you have been tested for lactose malabsorption or intolerance and have been found to digest lactose sufficiently than you do not need to modify lactose on the low FODMAP diet.  Many individuals have NOT been tested for lactose intolerance or are unsure if lactose is a trigger for them, in this case, minimize lactose while undergoing the elimination phase of the low FODMAP diet.

But even if lactose is a trigger for you…there are many dairy foods that are still allowed on the low FODMAP diet! Go ahead and enjoy yummy low lactose dairy foods such as aged or hard cheeses, think: Cheddar, Swiss, and Parmesan! Most semi-soft cheeses are suitable on the low FODMAP diet too, such as feta, goat cheese and Brie.  Avoid overly wet cheeses such as ricotta and cottage cheese which contain higher amounts of lactose.  Try lactose free cow’s milk or lactose free yogurt.  Even small amount of Greek yogurt can often be tolerated on the low FODMAP diet.  Greek yogurt tends to have less lactose than traditional style yogurt as more lactose is drained off when making the Greek style yogurt thick and creamy.   Of course, read ingredient labels for other added FODMAP ingredients such as fructose, inulin (chicory root), high fructose corn syrup etc.

When reading labels for cheeses–look at the Nutrition Facts label. If there is 0 grams of sugar in the cheese–then the cheese is lactose free or only contains a trace of lactose.  Remember lactose is a sugar. Unfortunately, this little trick is only useful when reading cheese labels; other dairy products such as yogurt often have other sugars added.

Butter only has a trace of lactose so is allowed on the low FODMAP diet.

Lactose containing ingredients hiding in products may include: milk, milk solids, curds, whey, yogurt, buttermilk, sour cream. Whey protein isolate is lactose free while whey protein concentrate may contain lactose.

There are some individuals that are intolerant to other components in dairy such as the protein casein.   If low lactose dairy still poses a problem for you by all means minimize it to your personal tolerance.  And of course, some people choose not to consume animal products.  In these cases, you might find alternative dairy free beverages such as rice or coconut milk your best bet on the low FODMAP diet.

My colleague, registered dietitian, Toby Amidor, wrote a wonderful cookbook featuring Greek yogurt called The Greek Yogurt Kitchen.  Check this beautiful cover out! amidor.greekyogurtkichen.tr

If you can tolerate Greek yogurt {like me}…then please leave a comment after this post on creative ways you use Greek yogurt in your diet and you’ll be entered to win a copy of this beautiful cookbook!  Of course, not all the recipes are low FODMAP–but I bet some are adaptable to the low FODMAP diet or can be new family favorites!!

Another cookbook give-a-way later this week…{Sue Shepherd’s latest cookbook!}

Stay tuned!

summer squash quinoa

Summer Squash & Red Quinoa Salad

Hello.

Today’s recipe is from Epicurious, called Summer Squash and Red Quinoa Salad.  I found this recipe on the web and have made it twice in the past 2 weeks!! It’s so seriously yummy that I just had to share it with you guys! Click here for the recipe! I didn’t have red quinoa so I used the white quinoa I had on hand.

summer squash quinoaThis salad makes great leftovers too! Feel free to morph the recipe a little to your desires–but I kept it just about the same. The toasted walnuts and fresh basil really add nice flavor!

quinoa summer squash summer salad

This week is flying! How can it be Thursday already?! … I hope you all are having a great week!  The summer in New England has really been perfect. Not too buggy…warm.  Great for hanging outside.  I am loving it!

Thanks so much for all your great Tuesday Tip ideas!! I am working on them.. and have asked some colleagues to guest post too–which is always fun and great to get another point of view.

I pulled two names from my comment list and the winners of the fun packets of paper straws are: 1) Erin and 2) Kate & Maddie  CONGRATS!!

So far I have had a very busy week and past weekend! Last Saturday, I did my first ever Warrior Dash! It was a 3.2 mile run with multiple obstacles–12, I think, and lots and lots of mud. ;)  I signed up without really knowing what a Warrior Dash consisted of…oops!  When my husband Russ showed me the videos online with the mud pools and fire…I was a bit horrified.  But, I did it and I LOVED it!

best warrior group

Yeah… a little muddy…but happy!

This week, I have been contacted from numerous reporters about the low FODMAP diet.  This is exciting… as this means the word is getting out about the low FODMAP diet! I am hopeful that more people that are suffering silently with IBS will hear about the diet and finally get the help they need!

Until next post, take care!

cautiononion

Yield to the almighty onion

Today is Tuesday and that means it is Tip Tuesday for those on the low FODMAP diet.

Providing some real time tips for you in light and fun way. 

TAKE CAUTION!  This is posted for your safety!! :)

cautiononion

So…what’s the deal with onions?  They seem to be the biggest trigger for most people with IBS.  Onions are a member of the fructan family.  Fructans, also known as oligosaccharides, are the “O” in FODMAPs.  Fructans can be termed:  fructo-oligosaccharides (FOS), oligofructose or inulin depending on the chain length of the carb, or the number of sugars held together in the fructan molecule. The longer chain fructans are termed inulin.

First, let me say, onions, for the 80-85 % of people without IBS, are not the bad guys.  Fructans are well known to increase healthy intestinal bacteria, increase calcium absorption, maintain the intestinal mucosal barrier, and reduce risk of colon cancer.  

But for those with IBS, onions are a well-known dietary symptom trigger.  

Because of the health benefits of fructans, staying on the low FODMAP diet indefinitely is not recommended. More research is needed to look at the impact of staying on the low FODMAP long term.

Fructans range from l-o-n-g carbohydrates chains to small carbohydrate chains;  tolerance may be variable depending on the number of carbs strung together.  We know that FODMAPs with the smallest amount of carbs have the greatest osmotic effects (bring water into the intestine.); we also know that the smaller the FODMAP the faster it tends to ferment.  Onions tend to have a smaller number of chains of carbs –even compared to garlic–so perhaps this is why I see less tolerance to onion in my patients.

So what about onions for FODMAPers…

Onions are everywhere. Lurking in our foods and hidden in our food labels. They seem to like to go undercover.  Do not approach them, stay on marked trails! If provoked or attacked by an onion, always try to fight back… with the low FODMAP diet, of course!

Tips to avoid onions while on the FODMAP elimination diet:

  • Look for the term natural flavors in your ingredient list, this can denote onion or garlic, especially if the food is a savory or salty item.
  • Leek, onion, shallots will contain fructans so limit them during the elimination phase.
  • Onion powder, minced onion, onion salt are concentrated onion (fructan) sources so avoid while on the elimination phase of the diet.

Enjoy the onion flavor while on your FODMAP elimination phase by trying the following:

  • Use the green part of scallions (green onion), green part of leeks, or chopped chives to your favorite recipes which have acceptable FODMAP amounts.
  • Add a dash of asafoetida powder (just a scant amount) to impart onion flavor in your dish.  Use gluten free asafoetida powder, if you are following a gluten free diet.
  • Saute onions in olive oil to infuse flavor, remove onions and use flavored oil immediately for the dish you are preparing. {Fructans are water-soluble so will not leach into the oil}.

Did you know In America, most of the fructans in the typical American diet come from wheat? Next, comes onion! Chicory root –added to so many foods and supplements is a fructan too! Be on the lookout for this sneaky additive in your ingredient lists.  I have recently found chicory root in yogurts, granola bars, calcium supplements and probiotics.

Have you found chicory root lurking in any unusual places?

 

 

mini-tortes2

Chocolate Chip Cookie Dough Cheesecakes

We all deserve a little treat now and again, right?  So, today, I am sharing a recipe from my childhood that I morphed a bit into a gluten free and low FODMAP treat.  The recipe of the day: Chocolate Chip Cookie Dough Cheesecakes.  Please take a peek!

mini tortes

As a dietitian, I am all about eating healthy most of the time.  If the goal of eating healthy is to live a long, healthy and productive life, I do believe a little treat can fit in.  I worry sometimes about people that feel guilty about eating a little taste of cake… like it’s evil.  I am a bit fearful that nutrition and eating in the US has become somewhat of an obsession….and not at all in a good way.  I am happy that Americans are more aware of the relationship of food to health but I am sad that food has become a substance of calories, fats and ‘nutrients’ or chemicals rather than looked at as simply food that we eat to nourish and enjoy.   In part, this transition has become a necessity as modern manufacturers don’t always have our back–their goal is pure financial gain and getting an inexpensive manufactured food into the hands and mouths of consumers to make the almighty  $$ buck.  But the fallout of food obsession can have dire consequences —food  becomes feared and obsessed over and along with it a new form of eating disorder called orthorexia nervosa is emerging.  Learn more about orthorexia nervosa  here. Or read a post from Scoop Nutrition on this topic here!

Don’t get me wrong,  I think being an informed consumer is a good thing. I think eating real foods grown in nature is a great goal. I hope that the food manufacturing world will be more transparent and that consumer’s will know exactly what we are eating when we buy packaged foods.  I realize that many of my clients can’t eat anything they want because they have a sensitive intestine.  I am hopeful that we all listen to our bodies and when a food or drink creates pain or digestive woes that we listen and minimize the offending item.  But eating something simply because it has minimal calories or is full of green vegetables but you hate the taste and get very little enjoyment from consuming it…to me, misses the big picture. Food should be nourishing but also enjoyed right?  Too much of a “good” thing–be it water or spinach–can cause harm.  Jamming 2 bags of spinach into a green drink can up the phytates and oxalates to levels that minimize mineral absorption and increase risk of kidney stones in susceptible individuals. More isn’t always better.

I am not one to rant about my beliefs, though my husband may beg to differ with me! Ha! But just wanted to say, I think we need to be a bit more gentle on ourselves with our many “food rules”.  It can be exhausting and stressful to worry about every bite.  I do understand how scary eating can become when every bite seems to trouble your tummy.  And I am hopeful that this area of digestive health will continue to blossom and help us all connect the dots.  Just be mindful that trying to be perfect or ‘clean’ with your diet every single day might just be asking  yourself to do the impossible.  And from a ‘big picture’ health vantage point, this attempt to be perfect rather than eating healthy the majority of the time, probably won’t add years to your life….but rather less life to your years.

Okay…on a lighter note…let’s eat cake! :)

This recipe is partially homemade and partially made with some semi-prepared ingredients…making it super easy to whip up.  It’s also very adaptable.  I made my cheesecakes in my 3 inch torte pans, but these can be made in muffin tins w/ paper liners for easy removal.

tortes

Chocolate Chip Cookie Dough Cheesecakes

Ingredients

  • 8 ounces of Farmer cheese (I use Friendship brand which has 0 grams of lactose)
  • 2 large eggs
  • 1/4 cup vanilla infused sugar (OR sub in 1/4 cup sugar and 1 teaspoon vanilla)
  • 1 tablespoon brown rice flour
  • 1 package refrigerated gluten free chocolate chip cookie dough (I use, Immaculate GF chocolate chunk cookies)

Instructions

  1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees.
  2. Prepare 12 muffin tins by lining w/ paper liners or lightly oil 6, 5 inch tart tins
  3. Press 1 cookie dough 'glob' about 1 tablespoon into muffin tin or 2 'globs' or 2 tablespoon into tart pan, press lightly to form a crust.
  4. In medium bowl, mix farmer cheese,eggs, vanilla sugar (or sugar and vanilla extract) and brown rice flour until creamy.
  5. Top 'crust' with about 1-2 tablespoon of cheese mixture--should leave a bit of outer crust showing.
  6. Bake at 350 for 20-30 minutes. Cheese mixture should be firm and cookies lightly browned on sides and cake tester comes out clean.
Schema/Recipe SEO Data Markup by ZipList Recipe Plugin
http://blog.katescarlata.com/2014/07/19/chocolate-chip-cookie-dough-cheesecakes/

How to make a low FODMAP meal final pdf

How to Make a Well-Balanced Low FODMAP Plate!

Hello Friends,

In the ever changing world of FODMAPs, it is my hope to keep you up-to-date in a quick yet informative way via my blog.  I will be focusing most of my upcoming Tuesday posts on quick tips…conveniently called, Tuesday’s Tips!  So be on the lookout!

Today’s Tuesday’s  Tip:  How to Make a Well-Balanced Low FODMAP Plate, a handout to help guide you in planning a well-balanced AND healthy low FODMAP meal.How to make a low FODMAP meal final pdf How to make a low FODMAP meal! Click here for printable.

Hope you are having a great week!  Plan ahead: this weekend is The Global Outreach Symposium on IBS with Mark Pimentel, one of the key MDs studying small intestinal bacterial overgrowth and IBS.  This event is planned for Los Angeles, California but is available global via webinar.  Click here to learn more!