Lemon Zucchini Bread

I don’t know about you, but I have a little sweet tooth. Russ and I have hit every bakery in the southern Maine seacoast this year…or so it seems. 😉

We have some of our regular bakery favorites such as Bread and Roses in Ogunquit (check out their rocky road bars–made free of flour) and Boulangerie in Kennebunk (their Boulangerie brownies are made with low FODMAP ingredients), and the 1690 house in Wells with delicious macarons and a couple other suitable low FODMAP cookies depending on the day and time of day you get there. We also love the iced Americano at Brewed Awakenings!

And…I could go on and on…because there is not a bakery in the world that I haven’t fallen in love with…ha! 🙂

But, the purpose of this post is to share a recipe for low FODMAP Lemon Zucchini Bread with a lovely lemon glaze.  I made this bread and immediately ate two pieces. It was that good.

The inspo for this recipe came via a friend on Facebook that posted this recipe, which I modified for the FODMAP-er.

I have to tell you that I drizzled the bread with the lemony glaze when it was still slightly warm, sliced it (oops, you are not suppose to slice bread when its warm, because it falls apart), and let the crumbly glazed mixture fall apart in my hands while I enjoyed every warm bite.  I encourage you to do the same. 🙂 

If you are looking for other low FODMAP zucchini-based recipes, check out my other recipes such as: Zucchini Walnut Pancakes, Zucchini potato tots (YUM!), Baked Parmesan Zucchini Fries, & Garlic-infused Zucchini Ribbons with Pine Nuts.

Here’s the Lemon Zucchini Bread recipe. Let me know what you think!

Lemon Zucchini Bread

Ingredients

  • Makes 10 servings
  • 1 1/2 cups suitable gluten free flour blend (I used King Arthur gluten free flour measure for measure)
  • 1/2 cup almond flour (I used Bob's Red Mill super fine almond flour)
  • 1 1/2 teaspoon baking powder
  • 1 cup sugar
  • 1/2 cup vegetable oil ( I used sunflower oil for the essential fats but you can use olive oil too)
  • 2 large eggs
  • 2 tablespoons freshly squeezed lemon juice (1 lemon)
  • 1/2 teaspoon almond extract
  • 1 1/2 cup grated zucchini (skin and flesh), about 1 medium zucchini
  • 1-2 teaspoons lemon zest
  • Glaze
  • 1 cup confectioner's sugar
  • 2 tablespoons lemon juice

Instructions

  1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees F.
  2. Prepare loaf pan with a lining of parchment paper.
  3. In medium to large size bowl, combine flour blend, almond flour and baking powder.
  4. Add sugar, oil, eggs, lemon juice and almond extract and mix to combine ingredients.
  5. Fold in zucchini and lemon zest.
  6. Pour mixture into prepared loaf pan and place in preheated oven.
  7. Bake for 50 minutes or until lightly browned on top and a cake tester comes out clean.
  8. Set bread to rest and cool down.
  9. Meanwhile in small bowl, mix confectioner's sugar with lemon juice until creamy.
  10. Drizzle glaze over cooled or slightly warm bread.
  11. Allow to cool for easier slicing OR enjoy while warm, but bread may be less easy to slice!
http://blog.katescarlata.com/2018/07/10/lemon-zucchini-bread/

 

 

28 replies on “Lemon Zucchini Bread

  • Hollyd

    Oh, Yum! I have a large zucchini from our CSA farm box and was trying to figure out what to do with it. Also love the pickle recipe. Works for all kinds of summer goodies. Thanks!

    Reply
      • Hollyd

        Just did! I used small muffin cups and substituted old fashion oats for almond flour (was out of almond flour). Mixed the oats with the grated zucchini for a bit to soak up some of the liquid. I won’t admit how many of those muffins I’ve already had.

        Several of your recipes are go-to favorites. I often use the curry mix in your chicken curry recipe for all kinds of dishes, with and without the chicken, potatoes, zucchini, greens… This week there was a lot cabbage in the farm box. Sauted cabbage with some onion tops and shredded carrot. Add the curry mix and coconut milk. Excellent!

        http://blog.katescarlata.com/2017/03/21/low-fodmap-chicken-curry/

  • EMily

    Hi Kate,

    Thanks so much for the recipe. I am going to Bailey Island Ina August and all your bakery recommendations makes me want to stop at each one on the way up the coast! This vacation will be my first low-fodmap so I hope to find my own bakeries that will suit my needs.
    How do you convert a traditional recipe like the inspiration for this one into the recipe you shared? Is it trial and error? Also before I had to go low fodmap I didn’t really care about baked good but now that I can’t just have anything I feellike I crave them more!

    Thanks for all your recipes. They are great inspiration.
    Emily

    Reply
    • katescarlata

      I have always enjoyed baking–so adapting to low FODMAP came some what intuitively to me. I would start with a suitable flour blend and find recipes that are almost low FODMAP naturally. I do find the flour blends with gums, such as King Arthur gluten free measure for measure tend to work best for breads and muffins. For cookies, I use a suitable blend without those additives such as King Arthur gluten free multi-purpose flour blend. Enjoy your trip to Maine! xx

      Reply
  • Sandie Saporito

    My hubby said, hey Kate has a new post and it’s lemon zucchini bread…he loves sweets. So l got busy and made them as muffins with key limes l had in the fridge. These babies melt in your mouth. I mean it!!! They are yummy. I sprinkled the tops of the muffins with demerara sugar instead of the glaze because we like the crunch. I think is the best zucchini recipe yet! THANKS!!!

    Reply
    • katescarlata

      Ohhh…so happy to hear that, Sandie! I love that you just happened to have key limes in your fridge! Love the idea of a little sugar on top–and the muffin adaption! They do melt in your mouth…right?!

      Reply
  • Marcine

    I just made this Lemon Zucchini Bread – it is delicious! Light lemon taste. I used vanilla instead of almond flavoring.

    Reply
  • Julianne

    Hi Kate,
    This bread looks delicious and I plan to make it with a few substitutions. I was recently diagnosed by breath test with sucrose intolerance, meaning my small intestine doesn’t make enough of the enzyme sucrase to digest table sugar. I haven’t found much information about it except from the makers of Sucraid, the digestive enzyme used to help digest foods for those with SI. Have you heard much about sucrose intolerance in the digestive health world? Switching to a low sucrose/low starch diet has really helped me with my symptoms–and now I need to reintroduce foods, similarly to how I once did on the low fodmap diet. The fodmap diet seemed to help me a little bit but never resolved my symptoms completely–and I now realize that some of the high fructose foods that I thought were bothering me are also high in sucrose (apples, peaches, onions). If you have any insight into SI, I’d love to see a post on it!
    Thanks =)

    Reply
    • katescarlata

      I do need to do a post on SI. Thanks for the reminder. It is also important to rule out small intestinal bacterial overgrowth as part of the reason for your positive sucrose test.

      Reply
      • Julianne

        Thanks Kate. How would I rule that out? -A few years ago my breath test for SIBO was inconclusive because I had a high baseline hydrogen, but my doctor treated me with Xifaxan anyway and it seemed to help at the time. A second time a year later, the Xifaxan did not seem to make much difference. On the sucrose-specific test, my overall hydrogen and methane levels rose. My GI is considering an endoscopy with a dissaccharide assay.

  • katescarlata

    I think doing a disaccharide assay is a great next step. It’s hard to know if the sucrose breath test was abnormal due to abnormal amounts of microbes in your small intestine (SIBO) or due to low disaccharide enzyme production.

    Reply
      • Julianne

        Hi Kate,
        I did the disaccharide assay and was within “normal” range for sucrase (low normal, but still). If you have patients that tend to have inconclusive breath tests for SIBO, do you generally suggest trial-rounds of rifaximin? Also, if a patient has relapsed after taking that antibiotic before, do you suggest trying something additional for methane (even w/o testing)?

  • Deb

    Kate, thanks again! This looks amazing. I especially want to thank you for including the exact brands and types of your flours. So many recipes I find online omit this information, and it makes a huge difference in some cases, especially when the flour blends have gum or leavening. I discovered, after some failures, that the Hershey’s gluten-free chocolate cake recipe posted everywhere online was originally made with a flour mix that included some leavening, so the recipe doesn’t call for enough leavening. My cake was short and stubby (but it tasted good!). So frustrating!

    As always, thanks for all your great info. I’ll be heading to your area of Maine soon, and can’t wait to hit those bakeries again. Bread and Roses makes me swoon.

    Reply
  • Karen

    Kate we have a nut allergy in our home. Do you think this would work if we use 2 cups of GF flour and omit almond and use vanilla extract instead of almond?

    Reply
    • katescarlata

      Yes, Karen, I think that substitution would work very well. Enjoy! Have you heard of the company, 88 Acres? They provide a variety of nut free options>> granola bars, seed butters and granola. Not all are low FODMAP–but some are–and they taste awesome.

      Reply
  • Kathryn

    Absolutely delicious. I halved the powdered sugar and lemon juice for the glaze and did not miss it at all. Also is there nutrition information available for this recipe and your others?

    Reply

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