Mexican Chicken & Quinoa Nourish Bowl

Hello Friends…I don’t know about you but I love a good nourish bowl.  What’s a nourish bowl? A bowl full of your favorite healthy ingredients where all the yummy flavors collide into one amazing and nourishing mouthful.

Today’s post is a simple and delicious Mexican Chicken & Quinoa Nourish bowl. I infused the wonderful flavors of chili, cumin, paprika, and cayenne pepper into ground chicken with Casa de Santé’s Mexican Seasoning Mix, a gluten free and certified low FODMAP seasoning blend. This post is sponsored by my friends at  Casa de Santé.

What I love about Casa de Santé’s Mexican Seasoning Mix is the spot on Mexican flavor it provides WITHOUT any added onion and garlic. You and your guests will not even know this seasoning mix is free of the fructans (FODMAPs) found in onion and garlic. You can purchase a variety of Case de Sante’s low FODMAP certified (by FODMAP Friendly) products on the  Casa de Santé site.

To save on preparation time, you can cook up the ground chicken and/or quinoa in advance and then quickly reheat them prior to assembling the nourish bowl.

For color and added nutrition, I added a few sliced radishes, lactose free sour cream (a tablespoon of plain Greek yogurt can be substituted too, it’s low enough in lactose), freshly grated cheddar cheese, sliced grape tomatoes, 1/8 avocado and fresh cilantro per bowl. Adding a few pepitas might be a nice touch too, for added crunch. But feel to make this recipe your own by adding in some of  your other favorite low FODMAP ingredients such as finely chopped kale, roasted red pepper strips, or thinly sliced scallions (green part, only).

Quinoa adds a nice boost of protein and fiber to this dish, but you can opt to use white or brown rice instead. I often keep the frozen pre-cooked quinoa, jasmine or brown rice in my freezer or prepare a big batch of red quinoa in advance for easier meal prep.

You can get 20% off any purchase in the Casa de Sante store using the code: Kate.

Mexican Chicken & Quinoa Nourish Bowl

Ingredients

  • Makes 4 servings
  • 1 pound ground chicken breast
  • 1 tablespoon Casa de Sante Mexican Seasoning Mix
  • 1/4 teaspoon salt
  • 1 tablespoon olive oil
  • 4 cups pre-cooked red quinoa (cooked according to package directions)
  • Toppings:
  • Grated cheddar (1/4 cup per bowl)
  • Sliced radishes (2 per bowl)
  • Sliced avocado (1/8 avocado per bowl)
  • Lactose free sour cream or Plain Greek yogurt (1 tablespoon per bowl)
  • 5 grape tomatoes, sliced (per bowl)
  • Chopped cilantro, for garnish, optional
  • 1-2 tablespoons pepitas, optional

Instructions

  1. Prepare quinoa, set aside.
  2. In medium skillet over medium heat, add in ground chicken, Casa de Sante Mexican Seasoning Mix, salt and oil.
  3. Cook ground chicken for about 15-20 minutes or until cooked through, stirring frequently, until crumbled and no longer pink, set aside.
  4. Assemble nourish bowl: Add 1 cup cooked quinoa to bottom of small-medium size bowl, top with Mexican Seasoned Chicken, cheddar, radishes, avocado, lactose free sour cream, tomatoes, cilantro & pepitas, if using.
http://blog.katescarlata.com/2017/02/28/mexican-chicken-quinoa-nourish-bowl/

 

9 replies on “Mexican Chicken & Quinoa Nourish Bowl

  • Chase

    Do you think this would still be yummy/filling/a complete meal without chicken? Any additional options for us vegetarians? As always, thanks for the most delicious recipes!! 🙂

  • Jason

    Yum… thanks for the great recipes. Could vegetarians substitute edamame for the chicken? I always thought that minimally processed soy beans were high in galactooligosaccharides, but the Monash University Low FODMAP app recently green lighted edamame. I find this very confusing and contradictory. I know a vegan on a FODMAP elimination diet, but I am hesitant to tell her that edamame is fine in significant amounts. The edamame I have has 6g of fiber per serving, so I would be surprised if a significant amount of that fiber wasn’t GOS. What are your thoughts about edamame? Do you think Monash University made a mistake or is edamame really low in FODMAPs? Do you think it may have been just a specific product tested?

    • katescarlata

      Hi Jason–edamame is an immature soybean –and this likely plays a role in GOS content. I think portion control is key here–I would trial 1/2 cup edamame –and assess tolerance. Some individuals may not tolerate the fiber load. Bear in mind though–fiber comes in all shapes and forms–some rapidly fermentable–some slowly fermentable and some not fermentable at all. I know from personal experience that too much edamame is does not work for me—but small amounts do.

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