Cheesy Layered Zucchini Stacks

How about this? Sliced zucchini and tomato layered with cheese into an individual serving stack!  So simple, yet so good.  And, yes, low FODMAP!Layered zucchini

I have been somewhat remiss with the blog this week because I have been researching the latest data on the gut microbiome, IBS, small intestinal bacterial overgrowth and all of the important topics I will be sharing with colleagues next Thursday at my Advanced Digestive Health Seminar.  I am so excited to share that 2 top gastroenterologists will be conferencing in during the talk to discuss some of their latest research projects…HOT off the press! Digestive health and the gut microbiome are very exciting areas of research these days!  I can’t wait to share some of this research with my colleagues!

It’s hard to believe but my blog is coming up on its 4th birthday on March 15th.  Yikes.  Not sure how that happened!  Anyway, bear with me over the next couple of weeks, I have a few presentations that are pulling me away from the blog and into research mode.  I promise, when the dust settles I will share what I have learned with all of you!

But, I did want to share a quick recipe with you, Cheesy Layered Zucchini Stacks. MMMMMmmmm good!Layered zucchini baked

Cheesy Layered Zucchini Stacks

Ingredients

  • Recipe makes 2 serving can double or triple as desired.
  • 1 medium zucchini, ends trimmed, cut in very thin 1/4 inch slices the long way (not rounds)
  • 2 tomatoes, cut in 1/4 inch slices
  • 1/2 cup finely shredded mozzarella cheese
  • 1/4 cup fresh basil, cut in thin strips
  • Salt and pepper, to taste
  • 1 tablespoon olive oil

Instructions

  1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees, line cookie sheet with parchment and lightly oil.
  2. Layer a slice of zucchini, followed by a couple tomato slices along zucchini slice, followed by a sprinkle of cheese and repeat layering into a stack. I used 3 slices of zucchini per stack!
  3. Season with salt and pepper as desired and drizzle with small amount of olive oil over the top.
  4. Bake for 20 minutes or until fork tender.
  5. Add fresh basil to top of cooked cheesy layered zucchini stacks.
http://blog.katescarlata.com/2015/03/05/cheesy-layered-zucchini-stacks/

OH…also wanted to share a quick product find!  Russ and I are in the process of getting a little cottage in Maine.  A dream come true….really! On our recent visits to Maine, we have stopped into Stonewall Kitchen in York, Maine.  I LOVE it there!! Well, I found a very yummy gluten free scone mix that appears suitable for my FODMAPers.  Of course, I bought it and made the scones. They were super yummy.  Best…fresh out of the oven! And the raspberry jam is nice too!Scones

 

16 replies on “Cheesy Layered Zucchini Stacks

  • cheryl

    Love the tomato dish. I use to make this and it is comfort food. But my Histamine Intolerance makes it a no no. I tried a thin slice of tomato yesterday, and my eye was swollen shut this am.
    So for all of you cheesy tomato eaters, savor a big bit for me. Yummy

  • Melinda

    Sounds yummy & easy. Will be trying. I made the Oat Bites & they are sooooo delicious !! Thank you for continually coming up with low Fodmap recipes 🙂
    Which 2 top Gastrointerologists will be conferencing on your seminar ?

    • Laura

      Hi Kate,
      Your recipes are excellent and super helpful.
      I had the same question, which are the two GI docs that will be presenting at the seminar? Although I won’t be able to make it from NYC, could the presentation be accessed at a later date?

      • katescarlata

        Hi Laura, This actual presentation will not be filmed. But the presentation itself–maybe filmed after the event for others in remote locations to see…working on that!! I have Bill Chey from U. Michigan and Ali Rezaie from Cedar Sinai conferencing in to the seminar. Very excited to hear about news from their labs! There is great research going on in IBS and FODMAP diets!

  • Sherry

    I had the hydrogen breath test for my IBS+C. I got diagnosed with SIBO. I’ve been on a Low FODMAPS Diet for almost 6 weeks. Should I stop now that I’m on an antibiotic for the SIBO?

  • Casey

    Looks delicious. Unfortunately, the cheese is problematic for a lot of us even those who not lactose intolerant.

    • katescarlata

      Perhaps you could try Daiya cheese if you live in the US–this is dairy free and well tolerated by my clients that need a dairy free diet. For most on the low FODMAP diet –mozzarella is well tolerated and acceptable as it is low lactose.

  • Anne

    Hi Kate,

    I’ve been reading your posts re: FODMAPS since last summer, and they have helped me a great deal, so thank you for all your work and research! I’ve searched past posts for the answer to this, but I’m not finding anything so thought I’d ask it here: Do you have any rec’s for an Iron supplement that is safe for those of us with FOMAP issues & IBS. My doctor would like me to be on 325 mg (65 mg elemental)/ day, so I’m concerned with the ingredients in these because I’ll be taking quite a bit. Do you rec any to your clients that they’ve found to be successful?
    Thank you so very much again for all your wonderful posts.

  • Trish

    Congrats on the 4th birthday of the blog! I live in Australia and, while finding the expert opinions here very good, I rely on your blog for interesting material and excellent recipes. I’m especially interested right now in the work you are doing in Digestive health and the gut microbiome, having seen tv programs that explain how important it is. By the way, I saw an article recently that said that peanuts are legumes. I thought they were OK for FODMAPers? Maybe peanuts are an acceptable way to get some legume-like food benefits. Thanks again.

    • katescarlata

      Hi Trish, Yes, the gut microbiome and health is very interesting. The role of diet is key! The GOS in legumes seems to be one of the desirable food sources for beneificial butyrate producing gut microbes–peanuts are a big source of GOS. Butyrate is a fuel source for the cells in our colon and is linked with reduced colon cancer risk. FODMAP sources–fructans and GOS can be tough for people with IBS to tolerate—but the goal is to include some into the diet as tolerated to help feed these beneficial organisms. There is great interest in this area and more research coming. We all need to stay tuned!

  • Vanessa

    I am looking forward to reading about your current research. I do have a question – when I was first diagnosed with IBS three years ago, much of the material I read stated that IBS was related to serotonin in the gut. Now it appears there is more research linking IBS to bacteria in the GI system. Are the two related? And if IBS is due to the bacteria in the gut, are therapies such as hypnosis and relaxation techniques still relevant? I guess this is more than just a quick question : ) I am just curious because it seems that ways to treat IBS are always evolving!

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