Services

Professional Speaking

Looking for an interactive and energetic A+ presentation? Kate Scarlata delivers. Kate is an internationally recognized low FODMAP diet and digestive health expert. Kate’s expertise in digestive health includes: IBS, celiac disease and small intestinal bacterial overgrowth. She engages and enlightens her audience revealing the connection between nutrition, digestion, gut bacteria and human health. Her specialized presentations have been heard across the US for the medical community: (Massachusetts, Nebraska & Arkansas Dietetic Associations, Harvard Medical School, Lahey Clinic, Lahey Clinic Ocean Edge GI Conference, Yankee Dental Congress & the 17th American Neurogastroenterology and Motility Society Scientific Meeting) and in the corporate setting (American Express, EMC2, Whole Foods Market, Life Works and more.) Kate is a “repeat performer”—asked back frequently to speak again! or a dynamic food and nutrition speaker or webinar presenter, contact Kate.

Consulting

Digestive Health Practice and Registered Dietitian Nutritionist Coaching
Looking to ramp up your clinical digestive health practice setting to include low FODMAP diet consultation? Kate can meet with you or your registered dietitian(s) to provide low FODMAP diet coaching. Comprehensive and professional low FODMAP diet education handouts (11 handouts) for your practice will be provided so that your staff is ready to start consulting. Various packages are available call or email Kate for pricing.

Writing

Co-author of 21Day Tummy, a New York Times Best Seller, Kate has also authored/co-authored numerous publications including 5 books in total and countless articles. Kate has been interviewed in many national publications including: Ladies Home Journal, Spa, Living Without, Boston and Fitness Magazine.
Interested in the low FODMAP diet? Check out Kate’s newly published e-booklets and educational handouts to help you navigate the low FODMAP diet.

Looking for a freelance health writer? Need some professional food and nutrition handouts? Desire some creative, tasty and healthy recipe creations? Contact Kate to discuss your project needs.

143 replies on “Services

  • Angie Lockhart

    Hi Kate,

    My husband and I both have IBS and I suspect SIBO. After trying to battle on our own for a year (trying low fodmaps and paleo diet) I feel we need so professional help. Our health has improved but we are still not 100%.
    My problem is we live on the west coast, and believe me, i lament the fact that your services aren’t accessible to us! My question is how do i go about finding a RD with knowledge/experience with a low FODMAP diet and SIBO? As to date, I haven’t been able to find anyone through light internet searching. Do i need to contact the RD directly and ask? Is there a specific title they would go by?
    Thank you so much in advance. Many days I am so overwhelmed and depressed by it all but finding your site has been a ray of hope! Really. Thank you so much for the work you do.

    Sincerely,
    Angie L

    Reply
    • Well Balanced - Food - Life - Travel

      Good to hear from you Angie. If you let me know where you are located I can try to find someone that is knowledgable in SIBO and FODMAPs. Hang tight, having had SIBO myself, I understand how you can feel overwhelmed. Working with a dietitian and gastroenterologist that is experienced with SIBO can be such a good support. To answer your question, there is no title for a SIBO knowledgable dietitian–but certainly interviewing a practitioner prior to making an appointment is a good idea. I often connect with clients before their first session with me–either to gather a history and make sure I am a good fit for them…or visa versa.

      Reply
      • Audrey Amzalag

        Hi Kate. Can you recommend a RD in the Los Angeles/San Fernando Valley area specializing in SIBO and SCD/FODMAP ‘s?

        I am also anxious to find someone who can make meals for me following the guidelines of SCD/FODMAP diets.

        Any recommendations on how I could search for someone to make meals who’s knowledgeable in the 2 “diets” I listed?

        Finally, there are no words to fully express how appreciative I am of you for providing so much valuable information!! Thank you so much for giving so much of your time and energy which helps so many of us!!!!!

    • John

      Try IBEROGAST. It’s been used in Europe since 1961, is comprised of 8 or9 herbs, no prescription necessary. $40 per bottle which Will last a few months. Google it. Bayer bought them out in 2013.

      Our son’s doctor at MGH(Massachusetts General Hospital) recommended it for the first time after a colleague of his suggested it. The recommendation came after going through prescription drugs, to no avail, and our son continuing to lose weight((our 12 year old lost 22 percent(110 lbs to 86 lbs) of his weight in 5 months. Iberogast was the turning point.

      Go to clinical trials.gov, or search IBEROGASTIBEROGAST for more info.

      Reply
  • Maria Steckley

    Hi Kate, I have GI issues related to systemic scleroderma . Do you suppose this fodmad dieT would help? I seem to be in a form of remission at the moment. I have cut out milk, make smoothies for breakfast etc. I did try gluten free for a couple of weeks (8) . I didn’t find any difference. Just thinking maybe this would help. Did try to make an appointment with dietician / nutritionalist and found not covered under BCBS PPO insurance unless diabetics related. I also take a powdered vitamin and fiber called Relive Now and Fiberstor . How is this diet different from gluten free and do you think it would help A GI that is becoming hard by systemic scleroderma?

    Reply
    • katescarlata

      Hi Maria, you may find the low FODMAP diet helpful and I do believe it’s worth a try. Scleroderma increases risk of developing small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO). So you might want to look into getting tested for SIBO and discuss treatment options with a gastroenterologist that is knowledgeable in both SIBO and scleroderma. The low FODMAP diet reduces certain carbohydrates in the diet (gluten is a protein) that are rapidly fermented by gut bacteria (FODMAPs are like FAST food for gut bacteria). The low FODMAP diet can help minimize symptoms of SIBO and minimize gas/bloating/diarrhea and constipation.

      Reply
  • Kati

    Hi kate
    You’re website is amazing thank you so much. I’m just wondering if it is ok to eat yeast on the low fodmap diet?

    With thanks
    Kati

    Reply
    • katescarlata

      Hi Pat, I just forwarded the emails you should have received to download the books. I hope you like them and find them useful on your low FODMAP journey! Let me know if you have questions! Sometimes the emails end up in a junk folder–you might check there!

      Reply
  • Alla

    Do you have any information about doctor knowledgeable in SIBo in Dallas, Tx. According to OAT test I do have small intestine bacterial owergrowth. Trying to deal with it on my own, just because have a hard time to find somebody, who aware and knowlegiable enough to control. I’ll really appreciated for any suggestions that you have.

    Reply
    • katescarlata

      Hmmm….I have not heard of the OAT test. I don’t know of an MD knowledgable in Dallas. I asked my colleagues and they came up empty too. But I will continue to ask around!

      Reply
  • Mary

    Hi Kate,

    I am having issues with all kinds of foods some of which are even low FODMAP foods. For example, I made my own yogurt and fermented it a full 24 hours like the SCD recommends and that is supposed to make it lactose free. I tried a very small amount of it and I got fatigued and felt numbness in my toes.

    I also get very fatigued from brown rice flour products, yet amaranth and quinoa are well tolerated.

    Do you think I could have SIBO? I’m going to see Dr. Peter Green in NYC in July and I will have a SIBO test there. I’ve been having issues for many years and I don’t tolerate a lot of carbohydrate foods. It is very hard for me to deal with this and I am consistently losing weight.

    Thanks in advance….this website is great!
    Mary

    Reply
    • Patti

      Hi Christine,
      You may want to get tested for fructose malabsorption if you find you are having difficulty digesting coconut milk. I tested positive for it after noticing reactions to pure maple syrup, apples, etc.
      Patti

      Reply
  • Ella

    Hello! I have IBS and post-infectious dysmotility. I am looking for a nutritionist in the Philadelphia area who could help me get started on the low fodmap diet. Do you have any suggestions?

    Reply
  • Susan

    Hi Kate,

    Thanks so much for this incredible resource. My MD suggested I try the FODMAP diet. Do you know of any FODMAP experienced RDs in the Hartford CT area or where I might get tested (Hydrogen breath test, etc.)? If not, are you still accepting patients?

    All my best,

    Susan

    Reply
    • katescarlata

      Susan, Hydrogen breath testing is generally ordered by a GI doctor or PCP. I don’t know of any dietitians knowledgable in FODMAPs in Hartford. Another option for hydrogen breath testing is a home kit. Commonwealth labs has a reliable kit that your doctor can order for you and you do the testing at home. My practice is pretty booked out and full–but you can call my office and talk to my assistant who may be able to get a spot for you this summer. 508-533-0800 this is my Medway office.

      Reply
  • Susie

    Kate,

    A dietitian told me about your site. This is very, very helpful.

    I have tested positive for SIBO recently after five years of suffering (not knowing why) and a 21 lb. weight loss. I have a couple of questions. My own gastro doctor has been little help on this diagnosis and basically told me to come back in 4 months because he couldn’t help me with foods and probiotics. Is there a doctor who specializes in SIBO you recommend in the Boston area?

    I was treated with Xafaxin for 4 weeks. My symptoms are about 50% better but no one told me to eat normally to make the bacteria active–I noticed this suggestion on your website. I did continue to eat some wheat while I was on the Xafaxin, but was pretty careful about only eating low fodmap foods other than the wheat.

    I am seeing a second gastro doctor at Mass General in about a week. I am hoping he will have ideas for me. (My dietitian thinks I might need a different antibiotic treatment or probiotics.)

    I also have some questions on a few foods: molasses and agave. Are they Low FODMAPs?

    My situation is complicated by the fact that I am allergic to potatoes and corn and several other foods.

    Susie

    Reply
    • katescarlata

      Susie–I think Sue Kelly at BIDMC is well versed in SIBO in Boston. Molasses has not yet been tested–may be source of excess fructose. And Agave is definitely HIGH excess fructose (note it’s on the caution section of my checklist!)

      Reply
    • sally

      Since developing severe diarea problems after 3 bouts of Cipro for a bladder infection that was not severe, loosing about 30 pounds, living on bare subsistence,,rice,water, small amounts of various foods,omitting some that i used to eat,lots of various bean and grains, garlic,onions,etc and being so grateful for every step and breath, sunshine and a pretty view…:)Doctors confused by notes on my file, that all could see by using the computor….Went from being healthy, fit, muscled for years of exercise…to a different person…and I have a “mild case” according to one doctor.
      Now I follow more or less FODMOPS cheerfully…The D cut from 9 to12 to 3 tid more or less.
      REcently had dinner out, got lots of attention, since am am liked in some restaurants and experienced a “Better BM…then it went back to the usual wish it was better, less licquid.I am remindedof a story, that a little boy got a pile of manure for Christmas and said, somewhere in the pile of Manure there must be a pony

      Reply
  • Karen

    I have been trying FODMAP restrictions for several weeks to alleviate the cramps and diarrhea There is still some garlic in restaurant dishes, but otherwise I have been strict. I feel better but often need two immodium to stop the morning trips to the bathroom. Incontinence is a frequent issue in exercise of any kind…even walking.

    I eat more potatoes and rice than ever…as I am limiting the green vegetables that set me off. Kale and spinach may be OK…but not for me!

    I am frustrated that I am still struggling. Is alcohol a contributor? I have a vodka each evening or sometimes wine when at friends’. MY GI doctor suggested I try this regime, but it is only partially working for me.
    Any thoughts?
    Karen

    Reply
    • katescarlata

      Karen, alcohol pulls water into the intestine and can contribute to diarrhea or loose stool Trying a fiber source such as (small amounts) chia seeds which are low FODMAP but have some soluble fiber may offer you some benefit–but of course, discuss w/ your GI doctor as I don’t have your full history. Have you had a pelvic floor workup to determine if pelvic floor physical therapy may be helpful. Often it’s more than a low FODMAP diet to gain full symptom control–there are often overlapping issues that need to be addressed.

      Reply
  • Karen

    What is hard to understand is that I never had any issues before the past 5 years. I was a runner for 25 years and that kept me regular and normal. I stopped at age 55 to preserve knees for other activities. I am almost 71 now…very physically active and energetic. This is mainly a life style bother as my GI doc think I just have IBS, nothing more grave.

    I tried metamucil to add to bulk, but that can truly make things unbearable.

    There certainly are FODMAP choices that make things worse and I can avoid easily things like ice cream or similar dairy, carmelized onions and heavy rough veggies. But I am a serious chef and like to prepare interesting meals…not just grill and bake a potato. As a healthy person, I try hard to eat more vegetables than carbs….then suffer as a result. I have lost 5 pounds on this diet and am a size 2-4. Not looking to lose more weight.

    I can omit a nightly drink, although neither my internist not GI doc has said it was necessary to see if it helps at all. Otherwise, I am at a loss. Just keep ppping immodium, I guess.

    Reply
  • Mary

    Hi Kate,

    I’m having issues tolerating grains in general. Brown rice gives me fatigue yet the non-grain alternatives like quinoa and amaranth are well tolerated. Do you know what could cause this?

    Thanks,
    Mary

    Reply
  • lisa

    After reading these comments and identifying with people struggles ,I urge everyone to enlist Kate for her services and coaching. I have multiple digestive issues and was overwhelmed and frightened but the thought of eating. I can be perfectly candid and acknowledge that I had to learn how to eat again and could not have done that without Kate. It’s an ongoing process but she has changed my life and made it possible to identify all foods that are hazards.

    She is very respected and connected in her field and always finds the answers and is encouraging along the way. I have taken private sessions with her and learned more in an hour than I believed possible. I continue now to have ‘check in’ appointments which help keep me focused, updated on new foods and most of all confident about making proper choices.

    In short, Kate has changed my life. I have doctors as well as other health advisors but Kate is the single most important component to my digestive health. She is direct yet compassionate and will help you too.

    Reply
  • sally

    Hi, I am a serious chef,,,like you!
    lic very much, which I used generously
    I would love to keep in touch with you, if you like.

    It helps to be a chef, I think for this pogram to work…I miss the standbys in the frig for snacks like chickpeas with plenty of garlic, surprise, I can get by without onion and garlic,,They were lo cal and I used such things abundantly. have learned that much smaller quantities might be possible.

    My digestive problems kicked in high gear after taking Cipro 3 times in 9 months.Was relly sick, lost 34 pounds…most gained back since Dr Nath, a gastroenterologist told me, eat what ever I want..Whic I did until finding Fodmop.
    Sally larhette

    Reply
  • sally larhette

    curious, each day I look up some information about the problems of IBS, Chrons, etc….I have read that one does not know if they have the overgrowth in the small intestine without a biopsy.Yuk.

    and one should not go gluten free with out a biopsy, or the condition cannot be discovered and yes people feel better, much better in fact.
    Yet a true alergy can only be discovered by biopsy…yuk!

    if only we can find high technical non invasive ways to discover these things.

    Sally

    Reply
  • sally larhette

    I am wondering, after years of coasting along with little help or support from the medical community, I chanced upon Fodmap, really seeking to bring some order and control into my dietary life and concerns. As a chef,
    I could benefit, still a lot of work though, shopping and time in the kitchen.
    Right away, stirring away from “gassey”foods, that I loved and provided a canvas for culinary inspirations….there are so many of them that it is interesting . Why and How these foods with trublesome indigestable
    sugars….Right away some relief like, this is a big one, anxiety feelings in the solar plexis, the digestive area.More peaceful tummy. I do not know if I have any medical conditions like gluten insensitivity or harmful
    overgrowths. I do know I lost 30+ pounds , was sick for a year, looked awful, that was from a reaction to antibiotics, A number of possible diagnosis was given and medical records confused doctors who looked at them for clues. Finally I found some balance but with continual eliminaton problems. I have learned to look at my habits and can see, that many low calorie foods are in the FodMap caution group and I would eat lots of them with lots of garlic, onion, some herbs. So now will
    try much smaller amounts of garlic, onion, chick peas, cauliflower,mango,avocado, bready things and see where I go from here.

    Reply
  • Patrice

    Hi Kate,
    I have been having digestive problems for 3 years. I have had gallbladder removed, laparoscopy to see if I had endometriosis, have been dairy and gluten free for a year, and also have had every other GI test under the sun. My colonoscopy came back with “severe colitis”, however, my GI just slapped a general label of IBS on me and basically to deal with it. After much research, I found a new GI doctor who specializes in IBS. He put me on a Low Fodmap Diet since he suspected I have SIBO due to my severe stomach bloating and nausea. I strictly adhered to the FODMAP diet, but I still was having days of severe bloating and pain. My symptoms did improve, but I still had many bad days after being on it a month. I noticed that every time I would eat carbs that I would experience the severe bloating. I read, “Digestive Health with Real Food” which introduces an elimination diet that is FODMAP plus more. It takes out any type of nut and lots of carbs that are FODMAP friendly (like potatoes). I have been on this for 2 weeks and my symptoms have drastically improved and this is the best that I have felt in 3 years! It says that after a month you can start reintroducing foods, but it makes me so nervous to do so. Could you get me in touch with a dietician who specializes in SIBO that could help with reintroduction of foods? Or do you have any resources? I have felt amazing, but I realize a diet with hardly any carbohydrates in not one that I could be on for a long period of time.

    Reply
    • katescarlata

      Patrice–Thanks for sharing your story and it’s important to note that we all are different and therefore benefit from different nutritional interventions. I think the key piece here is understanding why starch-y foods have been an issue for you. Is it due to colonic bacteria imbalance or lack of digestive enzymes? Do you not make or have insufficient production of sucrose isomaltase enzymes?These enzymes play a role in starch and sugar digestion. Can you be screened for this? Do you have small bacterial overgrowth? I would circle back with your GI doctor and see if they can offer some thoughts or action plan to determine why starch-y foods trouble you. I am afraid I can’t offer individual nutritional advice via a blog. I can tell you that Jasmine rice might be a bit easier to digest–and perhaps try small amounts when you are ready to trial a new food. BUT ask the questions I posed earlier to your GI doctor first. Get some answers!

      Reply
      • dkaj

        Hi Kate, can you explain why Jasmine rice is easier to digest. Does it have to do with the rice having more resistant starch or less resistant starch, or what is the mechanism behind this. If it has to do with the type of starch which different types of rice are best tolerated when dealing with SIBO and fodmaps.

  • Patrice

    Thank you for replying so quickly! I actually haven’t been tested for SIBO. The doctor suspected that i had it and did not do the hydrogen breath test.He suggested I do a low FODMAP diet and then trying Rifaximin. Would you know of any online dieticians that would consult with me once I start to add food back? I would be paying for the service, I just don’t know if anyone near me (in Kentucky) specializes in FODMAP sensitivities and SIBO.

    Reply
    • heabra

      Hi Kelly-

      I am researching the FODMAPs diet and happened across your post from last summer. I know it’s been awhile but, if you are still looking for a gastroenterologist in the Denver area, you might want to check out Dr Burrows at Summit Gastroenterology & Digestive Wellness Center. Also have a look at Katie Jones of North Denver Nutrition Therapy. She is an RD with specific knowledge of the FODMAPs diet who often sees patients of Dr Burrows. To be clear, I have not actually seen either of them – this is all just info I’ve come across in my own browsing for providers in the Denver and Northern Colorado area.

      Reply
  • Carey

    Hi – my daughter (24) and myself (44) have stomach issues and have seen a GI Dr. He wants us to start the FODMAP diet, I am very overwhelmed to say the least. I found this websit and liked some of the recipes I found, is there more recipes and what are some good books to read so that I can better educate myself and my daughter as we start our new journey in life.

    Reply
  • Eileen

    Hi Kate,

    Your site is so helpful!
    I feel like I need further advice though.
    Can you recommend a dietician or nutritionist in the NYC area?
    Manhattan or Brooklyn.

    Alternatively, what are your rates for phone consults?

    Reply
  • Kay

    I have had IBS for about 10 years. Started the low FODMAP diet about 3 months ago. I’ve been doing pretty good on it. In a couple of weeks we will be traveling for 10 days with another couple. I have no idea how I am going to stick to this plan while eating out. I am scared to death this is going to ruin our trip. I have no way to cook and can only eat out. Please help!

    Reply
    • katescarlata

      Hi Kay, Traveling on the low FODMAP diet can be a bit tricky…but not impossible. First, don’t try to be perfect! If are staying in a hotel–request a refrigerator for your room. I keep low lactose yogurt, fruit salad, water bottles to have on hand. Try to pre-select some of the restaurants in advance –and review the menu online. Call the restaurant and see if you can speak to the chef to inquire if meats, chicken, fish can be grilled with just a brush of olive oil. Baked potatoes and plain rice are great fillers. Also salads are a great lunch option. Try your best to relax…and do as much prior to your trip as possible. Bring along some suitable granola bars such as Go Macro peanut butter or Bonnieville’s coconut almond cookies–to have as a snack if you get hungry.

      Reply
  • Garvisa Stroud

    Hi Kate,
    My G. I. Dr. suggested the FODMAP diet for me to try with a general list but not much more. I bought some Spelt bread like the list suggested but got it home and noticed honey as an ingredient in it. In some research that I’ve seen honey is at the top of the ” no-no” list. What do you say? Thanks for all the work you do on the website. It’s very helpful.

    Reply
  • Carol Benjamin

    Hi Kate,
    Can you tell me where to buy marshmallows without HFCS and Brown Rice Bread Crumbs? I have a Whole Foods near me and a Trader Joe’s.

    Thank you.
    Carol

    Reply
  • Carol Benjamin

    Thank you for responding. I will check out Whole Foods and/or Trader Joe’s. I looked at the PaneRiso web site but couldn’t find the purchase product page. I will continue to try just in case I am not hitting the correct icon. Thanks again for all the information you share.

    Reply
  • Allison

    Hi Kate – thank you for the very information website. I’ve been struggling with digestive issues for quite a while, primarily GERD/heartburn, bloating/belching and gastric/esophageal pain. I was taking a PPI (Prilosec) for a few years to deal with acid but seemed to be having more pain when on the meds so I switched to Pepcid AC Maximum strength. I have been GF/CF for about 6 years as well as avoiding most corn and soy. I have noticed certain things set me off, garlic, onions, inulin, FOS, glucomannan, most fruits, coconut products as well as things like xanthan gum. I’m sure there’s more since I seem to be sick daily. Digestive enzymes cause too much pain, regardless of the type I try so I gave up on them. I’ve had an EGD and complete abdominal ultrasound – both came back fine. I have a B.Sc. in Nutrition & Dietetics (1995) but was never trained in FODMAPs. I live in the Cleveland, OH area (east side) – wondering if you know of anyone versed in all the stuff I have going on? Not sure if I should be looking at HIDA scans, SIBO, FODMAPs etc. Any suggestions would be great. Thanks again!

    Reply
  • Terry

    Hello Kate
    I’m writing you from Calgary, Alberta Canada 🙂 I’ve been a soy-free vegan for 40 years, with a SEVERE allergy to onions & garlic.

    I find your site tremendously helpful 🙂

    I’m wondering if I could ask you to consider posting a few FODMAP strictly vegan recipes:) I’ve used several of your recipes already, and I know you make vegetarian/vegan suggestion by stating to eliminate the meat/chicken, and replacing with alternatives such as soy, etc… but I don’t eat soy either, and as per FODMAP; beans/lentils really bother me too 🙁

    Vegan “mains” recipe suggestions would be wonderful 🙂 I am so was overjoyed to learn about FODMAP; it’s changed my life 🙂

    I love the cheerfulness of your site:)

    Terry

    Reply
  • Angela

    Hi Kate,
    I came to the FODMAP diet about a month ago, after experiencing severe abdominal cramping, 15-20 trips to the ER in the past 3 years, and losing 20 pounds. My dietician at the University of WA recommended your recipes to me. I wanted to ask your thoughts on the likelihood that one could be sensitive to JUST fructan foods, particularly garlic and onions? Over the past month I have strictly cut out garlic and onion from my diet and I have experienced almost instant success– significantly less bloating, burping and diarrhea. I’m crossing my fingers that I will not experience cramping ever again, but I am unsure if I’m doing enough.

    I would love not to have to also cut out wheat, and/or the other FODMAP groups. However, am I fooling myself by thinking it may only be garlic and onion that cause me trouble? In the past black beans in particular have caused diarrhea, but I’ve not noticed problems with any other foods.

    Lastly, can spicy foods be part of a low fodmap diet?

    Best to you,
    Angela

    Reply
    • katescarlata

      Angela, Yes, you could be particularly sensitive to just the oligosaccharides–fructans and GOS–which contribute primarily (it appears) to GAS. FODMAP sensitivities are individual. Spicy foods are not really a component of the low FODMAP diet–but certainly people with GI distress often are troubled by spicy foods.

      Reply
  • Nancy Greenberg

    Hi Kate,
    I found this site last night and I am so thankful. I live in the Boston area and wonder if anyone wants to start a SIBO support group or do you have such a group at your office? Thanks, Nancy

    Reply
    • katescarlata

      Love that idea Nancy. I don’t have a support group at my office. I wish I had more time in the day to host one. I am pretty stretch work wise–and just keeping up w/ this blog!! I certainly would be willing to come and speak at a support group—but simply don’t have time to initiate one. keep me posted should you get a group started.

      Reply
  • Joe Medlock

    Thanks Kate, for your wonderful web site information. I have a question on bread that is made out of sprouts, no flour. Is it OK for someone that is trying to go gluten free?

    Reply
  • Rose Wilkinson

    HI Kate
    Do you know of anyone in the Pleasanton/Livermore area of the California East bay that is a FODMAP dietician? I would prefer to not have to drive too far and if there was someone who could do phone support that would be great.

    Reply
  • brett

    Hi, Kate! Thanks for the info on SIBO!

    Wondering if there’s anyone you’d recommend to see as a doc and as a dietician in Chicago who could knowledgeably help me out? Many, many thanks!

    Reply
  • Jaclyn Donat

    Hi Kate!

    I LOVE your blog. It is so helpful and encouraging and let’s me know I am not alone. I was wondering if you knew of any SIBO-knowledgable dietitians/nutritionists and gastroenterologists in Manhattan or Westchester, NY. I feel like I keep going to doctors who don’t know how to help me or who have no suggestions except to keep taking courses of rifaximin. Please help! Thank you so much!

    Jaclyn

    Reply
  • Betsy

    Hi Kate- You were enormously helpful in introducing me to FODMOPS after colon resection. I am now battling gallstones as a result of the weight loss from my GI surgery. It doesn’t look like I can avoid removing the gallbladder and am very worried about dumping post-op. I faithfully take probiotics, but am wondering if there is anything else I can do to stabilize my digestion post surgery. Thanks for any suggestions!

    Reply
  • Liezl Prinsloo

    Dear Kate,

    I just discovered your website and find it so helpful, thank you very much for the great information. I am 29 years old and had a lap-nissen funduplication operation 4 years ago. I’ve always had a very sensitive system (we now suspect that it has always been IBS), but ever since my operation, my IBS has been a bit worse. My doctors said that it is due to the side effects of the operation, which will increase the symptoms of my IBS. I was also recently diagnosed with a stomach ulcer (all fun and games!). So finding food I can eat sometimes prove to be very difficult.

    I went to see a RD after my operation and she placed me on a low-Fodmap diet and I did feel that it helped a great deal. Although I feel like through the years I fell a bit off the wagon and am struggling again with my IBS. I would like to find out whether you think I should revisit a low Fodmap diet again? I feel these days that I can’t really figure out what is making me sick (my symptoms are usually diahrea after certain meals), but I just can’t figure out what is causing it.

    I would also like to find out which probiotic you would recommend? I take reuterina daily, every second day and I also use Iberogast drops, but only when I experience symptoms.

    I will really appreciate any help or suggestions so much!

    Thank you very much Kate!

    Reply
  • Becky McCurdy

    I could write a book about how this has affected my life for 40 yrs , I am now 57 and I feel as though I just have lost hope. It is very difficult to have a colonoscopy and I was in hospital for over a week recently.. I have Ischemic colitis which is in a very bad way. I have had trouble with IBS, Colitis, swelling to the point on many occasions that many thought I was 9 months pregnant…. My Doctor( who is very good) has told me I have been extended so many times it has caused me more problems but my stomach that is suppose to work it nearly completely dead and it just has gotten very bad but he wants me to try this for a couple of months to if this will help me and if it does not we may have to go way of surgery.. This problem caused me to miss Thanksgiving, and so many many weddings, funeral, graduations,Christmas’ , birthday, relatives that visit because I am in pain and unbelievably extended. I am reading your site for the first time…. I need all the help I can get… I don’t know if I can find the type of dietician I need in the Pensacola, Florida area and how much they cost.. I stay constipated 97% of the time.. please advise me Please.. Hoping you can help.. ThANK YOU .Becky Mccurdy.

    Reply
  • bonni

    Thanks for your info! My daughter has had severe problems after being on repeated doses of antibiotics. No doctor has found anything wrong but her symptoms closely match SIBO. We are afraid of more antibiotics and their side effects but are curious to try the herbal types. I have two questions after reading your blog: if she tries the elemental diet, should that be done with herbal or rx antibiotics and/or as well or is it sufficient on its own? Also, after completing a two week elemental diet, how does she start “re-eating”? THANKS

    Reply
  • Susie

    I see Dr. John J. Garber at MGH. So far treatments have not been successful. Dr. Garber knows a lot about SIBO and is very nice and empathic. I am symptom free if I stay on the FODMAP diet (along with eliminating the foods I am allergic to). We are working on another angle to my treatment now. I am pretty discouraged that my case may be a particularly difficult one, but I am very happy with Dr. Garber.

    Reply
  • Mai

    Hi Kate
    Could you please accept me as your new client? Do you offer Skype consultation? I really need help but can’t find any dietitians/ nutritionist that know about SIBO in Chandler AZ. I lost so much weight, about 2 lb every week. I am 5’2″ and only 78 lbs now. I don’t know what to eat to gain weight as I don’t know how to cook American food. For 2 week already, every day I boils 1 lb ground chicken breast together with 1 lb of carrot and puree it to eat for the whole day with 4 spoon of mct oil. I am on day 3 of Xifaxan and see no improvement yet with a lot of gas and bloating. A few days ago I drink 8 oz of latulose for the breath test and my stomach made noise sound with a lot of gas for 2 days.
    Starting April this year I have a lot of gas pain especially in the upper stomach, excessive bloating, burping, stomach rumbling after eating and at night…..I went to a few gi doctors and got several endoscopy, ultrasound, cy scan, ugi xray and was told that I have gastritis and acid reflux and need to take PPI. I took 9 months of PPI with no improvement, just keep loosing weight more and more. Finally a new gi doctor let me do the breath test and got positive for sibo. My chart every 15′ from the latulose breath test was 12,31,30,29,48,27,48. However when I ask if this is methane or hydrogen producing bacteria, they don’t know. I am on day 3 of Xifaxan now twice a day. I hope to see some improvement soon.
    Please accept me as your client and teach me how/ what to eat to gain weight. Everyone told me that with 78 lbs, I look like a skeleton now.

    Thank you!

    Reply
  • sally

    Wish we were near by each other and then I could guide you through some cooking things;I was a chef,French and Italian.Love to cook anything and am interested in as many cultures as regular foods, like any found in most super markets…
    Thoughts are with yyou!
    Good Luck!

    Reply
  • krystina

    Hello,
    I am new to this website but would like some advice on my situation. I have suffered from Gerd and IBS for ~5-10 years (I’m 28) and recently was diagnosed with SIBO after a positive breath test. Of note, I have been on a PPI for awhile which I think may have contributed. I’m not super impressed with my GI doctor, and was wondering if I should get a second opinion. I’ve currently on my second round of rifaximin (30 days this time) after failing the first time. My symptoms improved somewhat, but not back to baseline, and returned within 1 week or 2 of stopping the antibiotics the first time. I’m about to finish my second round and am nervous of it returning. This is what concerns me about my current doctor:
    1. She keeps prescribing only rifaxamin, although I know I tested methane positive and read that neomycin is recommended with rifaximin.
    2. She keeps stressing probiotics, which I know is controversial and I’m worried to take.
    3. She doesn’t think a prokinetic is a good idea, which I would really like to try after reading the info from Dr. Pimental
    4. She told me the next step would be to prescribe a prescription laxative, but I dont think thats going to fix the root of the problem (constipation is my main symptom, but I also have severe gas, belching and bloating)
    Any thoughts? THanks so much- I really appreciate it!! This has been quite a journey so far.

    Reply
    • katescarlata

      Krystina,
      My thoughts are that you should get a second opinion from someone that has kept up with the literature as well as you!!
      I agree with all of your points. Though I do find that short term use of magnesium for laxative effect can help with symptom relief. Bottom line you can’t be full of stool and feel well. So sometimes a bowel regimen can be helpful while your intestinal motility improves post antibiotics. I am hopeful that probiotics will play an important role in SIBO management–but you are right–at present they are a bit controversial.

      Reply
      • Krystina

        Thank you for your quick response! I am actually in the Boston area- I noticed you recommended someone from BIDMC above, any one else you’d recommend? THanks!

  • Lisa

    Though I have been cancer free since 2/08, I have chronic, severe colitis caused by radiation treatment for rectal cancer. I take a small dose of amitryptaline, daily, which prevents the excruciating spasms I suffered for 3 years, but my digestive system function is severely compromised, which was still causing me much misery and many, many hours stuck in the bathroom.

    I have found this diet very helpful, in fact, it has made it possible for me to lead a much more normal life, since I no longer have to be very close to modern bathroom facilities at all times!

    I haven’t found a need to be GF, but try to stick to the rest.

    I noticed that there is a note on the HIGH list next to APPLES that says it depends on the variety. Since I love apples, is there one that I can eat a small portion of without ill effects?

    Reply
  • Jaclyn

    Hi Krystina..

    I am in the same boat as you and have done SO much research on everything about sibo. I also have suffered from severe constipation and bloating for as long as Ican remember (I’m 24). I tested positive for SIBO in October and my GI (literally acts the same as yours because I believe that since sibo is so new they don’t know much about it and already have a set perspective) only gave me Rifaximin as well. I did two unsuccessful rounds of it and finally was allowed to do 14 days of Rifaximin + neomycin which definitely helped more. He refused to give me the Prokinetic and tried to prescribe me linzess, the prescription medicine and guess what.. 3 weeks later SIBO Is back. I’ve been lucky enough to be able to find and talk to some leading researchers in the field like Dr. Allison Siebecker who studies with Dr. Pimentel and she said she could have predicted it was going to come back without the Prokinetic. My advice is to NOT take the linzess, it’s not solving the problem and to try to find any doctor that will prescribe you the erythromycin 250mg cut in 4s once at night for a minimum of 3 months. I am in the process of convincing my GI to do the same but will not start another round of antibiotics until he agrees to give me the Prokinetic or else it will be pointless. On the other hand, I’ve been reading a lot of success stories with functional medicine and SIBO, such as diet and supplement regimens to heal the gut and intestinal wall lining so have been struggling to decide which path I want to try since antibiotic use also directly feeds the bacteria. Email me if you want to continue talking and share advice – starlight4266@aol.com

    Reply
  • Susan Marshall

    Hello
    I have severe Crohn’s disease. I saw a nutritionist who introduced me to Fodmap but she left practice and was never replaced. I have since moved close to Oneonta, NY and was wondering if you know of anyone in this area that I can go to so I can continue on the Fodmap. Thank you for your time.
    Sue

    Reply
  • Jessica

    Hi Kate,

    I have been following the FODMAP diet for a few months now and have seen massive improvements on my health after suffering from bad IBS & Acid Reflux for years.

    Prior to FODMAP, I was a total gum addict. I chewed gum or ate mints several times a day, every day (bad breath is a major pet peeve for me). Since FODMAP I’ve struggled to find a gum or pint that isn’t made with artificial sweeteners or things on the high fodmap list. But yesterday I came across a product called Eat Whatever Mints. They’re all natural, made with peppermint, sunflower and parsley oil. But the mint has 2g of “Sugar Alcohol” listed in the nutritional facts. I saw a previous post of yours that mentioned sugar alcohol’s as being bad, but the actual ingredients list for this product just says sucrose, not any of the bad -ol (sorbitol/xylitol/etc) artificial sweeteners.

    Is this an ok mint to consume? I’d love to get your feedback!

    Thanks,
    Jessica

    Reply
    • katescarlata

      Hi Jessica,
      It might be that the 2 grams of sugar alcohols are from the glycerin? But I am not really sure–I didn’t see the nutritional facts-just the ingredient list.
      Perhaps give one a try and see how you feel?

      Reply
  • Deb

    Hello Kate,

    Just discovered your blog and wish to start with appreciation for all the great information and help you are obviously providing to so many. And with a lovely, caring touch!

    I’ve very recently been introduced to SIBO via a newsletter I subscribe to, and was amazed to think it may apply to me. I’ve been trying to heal a “leaky gut” for several years, but haven’t been strictly compliant overall. Probably because my GI symptoms weren’t severe enough to force it and seemed to respond fairly well by taking digestive enzymes every time I ate anything.

    Then, about 3 months ago I travelled to Mexico and my take home souvenir was a mean case of Montezuma’s Revenge. After it wouldn’t resolve on it’s own, my GP prescribed 5 days of Cipro. I felt somewhat better, but still, the rumbling and gaseous discomfort every time I ate anything.The past 2 days I have attempted low FODMAP foods and have had much improvement with bloating and GI noise.

    I understand that SIBO can develop after a bout of food poisoning, but do not know if this requires anything different regarding treatment. Do you have any advice in this particular situation? Thanks.

    Reply
    • katescarlata

      You should be tested for SIBO and be treated accordingly. Cipro for 5 days is not enough for SIBO. Typically, my patients are treated with rifaximin 550 mg 3 times per day for 14 days. Food poisoning can impact long term gastrointestinal motility–so you might benefit from low dose erythromycin post antibiotics –50 mg erythro or an herbal rememdy called Iberogast. It’s best you work with a knowledgeable GI doctor and dietitian–as a blog format is not appropriate setting to provide individualized guidance.

      Reply
  • Anne-Marie

    Hi Kate, I have Lymphocytic Colitis. The gastroenterologist that I’ve been working with suggested trying a gluten free and lactose free diet. After four months of that diet I didn’t experience many changes in my symptoms. Just last week my doctor also said I should try the FODMAP diet. After just a couple of days on FODMAP, I experienced some relief in my symptoms. My question, is whether you know of cases of Lymphocytic Colitis that have been cured or managed with dietary changes, specifically FODMAP. Also, I’m in Massachusetts and wondering if you provide any one-on-one FODMAP coaching. Thank you. Anne-Marie

    Reply
    • katescarlata

      Not sure we have evidence to say that diet cures colitis. But….it can manage symptoms. Sounds like you had some FODMAP sensitivities. I would be sure to do the re-introduction phase of the diet to ensure you are not overly restricting your diet long term. Currently, my practice is closed to new patients. That can change as patients improve and don’t need my services anymore 🙂
      I do have a wonderful colleague that sees digestive health clients in my office–she uses all of my educational materials and is well versed in the low FODMAP diet. Currently, she is fee for service–no insurance coverage—but if you’d like to see her…call my office at 508-533-0800 and ask to schedule with Janine.

      Reply
    • Cathe

      Ann Marie and Kate, I also have lymphacytic colitis, diagnosed 2 1/2 years ago. After 2 long rounds of Budesonide things were calmed down enough, and I heard about FODMAPs. I’ve been managing pretty well, not following perfectly. I also have to take Doxycycline for a week every other month for a lung condition, as well as having multiple other health / abdominal issues resulting from radiation treatments many years ago. I take Allyne probiotic. Recently I began to have unpleasant symptoms which quickly increased over 3 weeks to a full blown flare-up. In order to have some normalcy, I’m back on the Budesonide (very expensive! ) the GI doctor explained that, as an autoimmune disease, the triggers are not always obvious and it may just be for no reason at all : (
      I’m wondering if some of the foods that didn’t used to bother me, now don’t like me, and I need to reevaluate my food choices. The major ones that I stay away from or restrict are lactose, gluten, fruits, and the worst fodmap vegetables. My GI doc told me to avoid raw foods and cook well the other allowed ones for now. After 10 days on the med, there isn’t much improvement; distressing because I’m planning to work at a children’s camp for a week in July. By the way, are quinoa and black olives OK? I need something to snack on, and most of what I hear folks are using is not well tolerated…. Thank you, Kate, for your research and wonderful insights.

      Reply
      • katescarlata

        Cathe, I would encourage you to get tested for SIBO! And quinoa and black olives are low FODMAP…but quinoa is high fiber–not tolerated by all. I encourage you to work with a dietitian well versed in inflammatory bowel disease to guide you!!

        Kate

  • sally

    REading your comments I felt honest feelings of compassion for you!

    I do hope your path gets brighter with good healing!

    Reply
  • sally

    Grateful for really helpful Fodmap way to go.I cut back to almost nothing, the things I loved and ate a lot of, garlic,onion,mushrooms, cauliflower, mangoes, few others.

    Reply
  • sally

    Possibly Cipro brought on or created the condition to happen for my colitus diagnosis…lost 35 pounds. sick several months.
    after a year, went to a MassGen Gastroenterologist who told me to eat anything I wanted, after looking at the doctor notes on the computor. another Gastro enterologist was very confused by the several layers of notes, starting with way before the colitus notes from a colonoscopy.

    Reply
  • Jaclyn Donat

    Hi Kate!

    First, as always, I LOVE your blog – it’s so inspiring!!!

    I have SIBO and IBS-C and have done four rounds of antibiotics + herbs and for 2 weeks after the antibiotics my C seems to greatly improve (after 25 years of it!) and then I always feel that moment when it blocks again and comes back. Does a low Fodmap diet help people with IBS-C too? One of the courses of antibiotics I followed a strict paleo/low Fodmap diet right when they ended but sure enought 2 weeks later my C was back full force along with higher methane levels again. Do you think I should be supplementing with digestive enzymes, HCL (I have low stomach acid), probiotics, etc? I feel like it keeps coming back because an underlying issue isn’t being fixed, just don’t know what that is :(. Any advice would be greatly appreciated! Thank you!

    Reply
    • katescarlata

      If you have low acid–then you likely need some supplements to aid that deficiency. I can’t provide individual advice per se in a blog format–it is not good practice–as you can imagine. But I would try to find a health professional to provide some guidance. You might want to have a pelvic floor workup to see if pelvic floor dyssynergia is part of your picture. If you are retaining stool in your large intestine–this can impact the motility of your small intestine…which could be a risk factor for SIBO! Another option–would be a good bowel regimen to keep your large intestine cleared. Probiotics might be helpful–we need more research in this area though to know which ones might be helpful.

      Reply
  • Shannon Robertson

    I was ordered this week to follow a low FODMAP diet by my GI doc. I’ve been in a foul mood, but finding your site and resources today has me relieved that I can do this. I’ve gone from having diahrea to constipation. Just trying to figure things out now! I may try and find an RD expert here in Baton Rouge. Let me know if you have any recommendations. Thanks.

    Reply
    • katescarlata

      Shannon, I do not know of any dietitians in Baton Rouge that are FODMAP knowledgeable. Be sure fiber and fluids are adequate…being constipated obviously is not good either…perhaps discuss with your GI doc.

      Reply
  • Margaret Barlow

    Hello Kate. I wish there were more of you to cover everyone’s needs, me included! That brings me to my question. Do you know of a dietician in the Syracuse, NY area that is knowledgeable in Low FodMaps and SIBO? Like, many on this blog, I am suffering and haven’t been able to locate a professional that is experienced in those areas.

    Reply
  • Margaret Barlow

    Kate….
    Should have added this in my previous comment.
    I’ve read a lot about Enterically coated peppermint oil and IBS and SIBO…..being helpful in lessening symptoms and perhaps killing off overgrowth of bacteria. Do you have any experience working with clients and peppermint oil? What are your thoughts on this?

    Reply
    • katescarlata

      Yes, Margaret—I do encourage enteric coated peppermint oil –especially if pain is a troubling symptoms. It can have anti-microbial properties too. I don’t think it would work on it’s own for SIBO–but might keep bacteria at bay after treatment with an antibiotic–though I have not seen any studies to confirm that.

      Reply
  • Barb Fuller

    Hi Kate,
    I think your site is great. Great recipes, information and stories. Thank you for sharing all of your knowledge with us.
    I also have Lymphocytic Colitis, as does someone above on a post. I have never found anyone to talk to about our type of colitis.
    I’ve been on low FODMAP for 2 weeks and I don’t notice a difference yet. I always have diarrhea when I go. I’ve had this for almost 30 years.
    Do you think I should continue to stay on it for the 6 weeks?
    Thank you.

    Reply
  • Ann Kelly

    Was recently diagnosed as fructose intolerant/malabsorption after several several rounds of antibitotices to clear up SIBO.

    Don’t seem to have any wheat or lactose problems, just fructose and some fructans (onion and garlic). Are your low fodmap recipes suitable for use for FM or are there ingredients that I should avoid.

    Love this sight.

    Reply
    • katescarlata

      Most of my recipes are low FODMAP. The low FODMAP recipes–are noted in the low FODMAP recipe section. Depending on the person, my low FODMAP recipes should be suitable for FM–some individuals with FM –especially children– have less wiggle room with fruit serving sizes—but the low FODMAP diet is generally prescribed for an individual with FM. For Hereditary fructose intolerance, however, the diet would be more strict and likely the recipes on my blog would not be suitable.

      Reply
  • Barb Fuller

    Hi Kate,
    I have a relative that is doing very well on FODMAP. She has been on Lomotil for years, even before the began the low FODMAP. She told me that taking Lomotil daily during the diet was part of her healing plan. This was from her dietician. She actually said that the Lomotil helped her gut heal. I have never heard/read anything about this. If you are having constant diarrhea would this be part of a healing plan, or is the food alone what heals your gut? I am very curious about this. Thank you.

    Reply
  • Amanda

    Hi Kate,
    I am new to your blog and have to say that I appreciate all the information you have put out here to help those of us with IBS. I was diagnosed with IBS with no instructions on how to live my life. I take two cap-fills of Miralax everyday and feel extreme fatigue daily. My previous GI doctor told me that I may have to be on Miralax for the rest of my life. I have tried various diets including low FODMAPS. I can’t help but feel like something else is going on. Recently, my IBS has gotten much worse. Due to my experience, I do not want to return to my previous GI doctor and would like to have a thorough work up by someone know is knowledgeable in these areas. I am also in the Boston area. Do you recommend anyone? I’m sorry for the long note and thank you so much!

    Reply
  • Julia Mohn

    Hi Kate,
    I have been trying every diet I could possible find most of my life. Couldn’t figure out what was wrong. I was diagnosed with IBS-D in my 20’s. In my 40’s I was diagnosed with colitis and Hashimoto’s Disease. Then in January I had surgery(Laparoscopic Cholecystectomy) for what they thought was cholecystitis/gallstones and inflamed gallbladder.
    When I wokeup after surgery, I was informed that I had, in fact, Agenesis gallbladder a rare anomaly/birth defect. They found that I have an usually large bile duct leading into the liver with biliary tract leading to my intestines. No cystic bile duct or gallbladder was found. They check surrounding organs and found everything else healthy. Glad to know that.
    So that explains everything.

    Ultrasounds, MRI, CT scans, HIDA scan all showed no gallbladder present.

    My surgeon was not positive that the findings were correct because of the rarity, so we opted to do surgery anyway because we knew something was just not right. He said it is not unusual that tests do not show gallbladder and stones if it is diseased, inflamed, or shrunken…..in fact it can sometimes be hidden inside or behind the liver or other organs. I didn’t want to take a chance of leaving an inflamed gallbladder inside my body. So the decision was made to have surgery.

    My symptoms are upper right abdominal pain, diarrhea with most foods, everyday, dizziness, headaches, fatigue, fever and colon pain from the colitis. Still have all these symptoms. So I am going to try the FODMAPs diet along with supplementing with bile salts to help with the D. I do have a dairy allergy as well.
    I’m mostly healed from the surgery and feeling better. Just still having dietary issues.
    Do you have any dietary advise for this issue?

    Love your blog.

    Thanks,
    Julia Mohn

    Reply
  • Melinda

    Hello Kate. Thank you for all that you do for us fellow sufferers! I was wondering if you had any advice for me to help me through the next couple of months. I recently suffered from a gum infection following a dental procedure. I had to take a seven day prescription of clindamycin and now need to take two months worth of doxycycline. I have an IBS-C diagnosis and follow the FODMAP diet to help. I also take Align and Miralax as instructed by my doctor.
    After a week of the second antibiotic, I am suffering from bloating, gas and pain by mid-afternoon. Any suggestions? I’d appreciate your advice. Thank you.

    Reply
  • Dawn Halstead

    Kate, do you have a recommendation for a whole foods vitamin? I have SIBO, among many other GI dysfunctions. The dr recommended Centrum Silver for women, but I think there has to be one that would be more beneficial. Besides extreme weight loss over the last year, my eyelids and skin under my eyes has gotten red, dry and flaky. Can you recommend anything or at least ingredients to avoid when shopping for a multi-vitamin? Thank you.

    Reply
  • Susie

    Dawn,

    I don’t mean to confuse things but I have SIBO and my doctor does not want me to take vitamins unless I develop a specific vitamin deficiency. His concern is that vitamins are food for bacteria and they could fuel the SIBO causing bacteria which is the last thing you want to do. Just sharing his view on this for you to consider.

    Susie

    Reply
  • Dawn Halstead

    Susie, thank you for your reply, that is a very interesting perspective that I had not considered but understand it completely. There is so much conflicting information out there. I do know intuitively that I am not absorbing nutrients like I should and feel I need some kind of supplement, but don’t want to get the wrong one for the very reason you shared.

    Reply
  • Stefanie

    Hi Kate,

    Thank you so much for your website! I visit constantly and have seen amazing results on the low fodmap diet.

    I am looking for a new nutritionist who can help with the low fodmap diet. Do you have a colleague you would recommend in New York City?

    Thanks!

    Reply
  • Kelly McCabe

    Hi Kate,
    I have IBS and SIBO and have been following a LOW FODMAP diet after taking antibiotics for two weeks. I already feel better and I am taking probiotics to help heal my gut. I am currently taking inner-eco probiotic, and just bought kefir the other day. I love the green valley lactose free yogurt, so I thought I would try their kefir which is lactose free as well. What is your opinion on SIBO patients who drink kefir? I am reading mixed reviews that it is a great probiotic, but may not be suitable for patients with SIBO. MY stomach started bothering me again yesterday, and I do not know if it is from the kefir. I am thinking maybe I reacted badly because I did not get plain, and there may have been too much sugar in the one I purchased. I do not know if I should drink it or not, and I do not want to lose out on the benefits of kefir if it could turn out to help me in the end.

    Best,
    -Kelly McCabe

    Reply
    • katescarlata

      There is very little research supporting the use of probiotics for SIBO. In clinical practice, I find that too much probiotic rich food or probiotic supplements tends to make symptoms worse. I love the idea of adding in a probiotic–but this is an area of greater research. I find my patients can tolerate some probiotics–low dose via probiotic rich foods or supplements–but not every day. Tolerance is variable person to person. Listen to your body.

      Reply
  • Lisa Goldbaum

    Any suggestions for a knowledgeable practitioner in Westchester, NY? I’ve been flying solo for too long, and am getting very confused by all the different dietary recommendations. Thank you!

    Reply
  • NC

    I have had IBS for 2 years now. Had 1 doctor over dose me on medications, which sent me to the ER. U have a new doctor now, she has me on Linzess, But ever since the overdose, I seem to no longer be able to stomach the medicines.

    Do u have any suggestions?
    Also, do u have any doctor recommendations in the dallas/ ft worth area?
    (So that could be in Dallas. Arlington, plano, irving, etc.) We r willing to go anywhere for a good doctor.

    Reply
  • Tasha

    Kate- you may have answered this question in another post. My daughter was diagnosed with SIBO right before she started college. She is in college in Boston. I am looking for a doctor for her to see that treats SIBO in the Back Bay/Fenway area if possible. We are from out of state and our doctors at home are not as accessible as I would like.

    Reply
  • Samantha Pender

    Hi Kate,
    I am a 21 year old college student and recently got diagnosed with sibo before going abroad for a semester! Do you know anyone in the south of Boston MA area that treats Sibo? Thank you!

    Reply
  • Sheila kennedy

    Hi,
    Would appreciate some direction and advice. Long history My son was born and immediately constipation was an issue. Following doctors orders put corn syrup in his bottle and then he began taking Milk of Magnesia ((3-5 yrs old).
    At 4 was told he had a pouch at the end of his colon and we really monitored bowel movements.
    Suffered with chronic hives for 7 yrs.( 14-21) was prescribed a Zyrtec. Began suffering side effects(night paralysis) and was weened off at 21
    Severe Acne( 17-21) Accutane prescribed (20) for 8 months
    Freshman yr of college(19) severe stomach distress loses 18 lbs. and he begins a dairy and gluten free diet/ low fodmop- tested for dairy and gluten intolerance- all negative- already off those foods.
    Tested for H Pylori, colonoscopy all fine
    Now 24, eats no dairy, gluten- exercises, healthy diet. Starting to notice hair loss, low energy and continues with intermittent stomach pain and bloating. Socially become distressed and anxious because food is always an issue.
    He is an amazing trooper, reluctant to go to another gastrointestinal for more medical invasive tests with negative results. He mentioned SIBO but not sure where do go for a test. We live in the Boston area and are willing to travel. Any suggestions would be greatly appreciated! Sorry for the long explanation.

    Reply

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